Tag Archives: Water

Out There: News

It occurred to me that I forgot to mention some exciting news from the last couple of months.  When we first looked around Staunton, our new home town, we visited a great gallery that is the Shenandoah Valley’s largest cooperative gallery.  Co Art Gallery has been around for over 20 years and has many of the area’s most well known and loved artists as it’s members.  In my mind, I set it as a goal to be part of this wonderful space if we should settle in Staunton.

It had been on my TO DO list since moving in September to find out about applying to the gallery but I was more involved in new house adventures and it didn’t happen.  One day in late January, I looked at my TO DO list and, ignoring all the other things on the list, focused on the gallery and thought, “OK, just do this.”   I called the gallery, found I needed to drive down and get an application, so did that immediately.  I spent the afternoon , completing the application, updating my CV, and deciding what pieces to include for the standards committee to review.  The next morning I took it all down and left it at the gallery.  And then waited.  In a week or so, I was told that I had been accepted!  Woo Hoo!!  I was and still am so honored to be part of this wonderful group of artists.

March was my first month at the gallery, so I spent the rest of February deciding what to hang in my space and preparing those pieces.  Each artist is assigned a space that is approximately 5 or 6 feet wide and you can put whatever you choose in your space.  Every three months the whole gallery shifts around.  We change spaces and change art work to keep it all fresh and interesting.  I’m currently preparing new work for the next big shift on May 5. There are also bins for loose prints  as well as shelves for note cards.  I’ve placed some of my Inner Aperture Fine Art cards on the shelves and will be adding just a few prints to the bins this week.

Each day, a different artist, or two, is at the gallery as a  docent to assist people coming in to the gallery, located on the main street of downtown Staunton in one of the many architecturally fascinating buildings.   After serving as docent a few times, it’s been quite interesting to meet other artists whose work is in the gallery as well as the people who come in to see the work.

My display on the day I set it up in early March.

Close view of the pieces I hung.

Just last week, 3 of my pieces sold.  The first one, The View from Shore 10, I replaced with Flow. Flow sold the next day. and Calm Waters replaced that.  I few days later, Between the Mountains and the Sea sold and I replaced it with Golden Aspens 1.

It was a good week!  I’m happy that the work is speaking to people.

Open to Delight: A Walk in the Woods

We got out for our first hike of the year the other day.  It was just a short bit of a hike since the water in the stream was too high to cross that day.  It looks like a hike that would be fun to do several times throughout the season as there are huge groups of mountain laurel as well as rhododendrons, and who knows what else?!  And if you can cross the stream and go further there is a waterfall to enjoy.  Hiking in Virginia in late March was such a delight.  We are used to  Mud season in NY’s Adirondacks that makes hiking a challenge in the spring time.

Here are just a few glimpses of a lovely time in the woods.

Out There, again…results.

Thanks for all the input to my post earlier this week, Out There, again.

I have news to share.  🙂

One of my images was accepted by juror Michael Pannier to the Seasons exhibit at the SE Center for Photography in Greenville, SC. This image is a personal favorite of mine so I’m happy as well as honored to have it accepted into this relatively small show. The entire exhibit can be viewed at this link.

Calm Waters

For the NVACC  Eighth Annual Abstract Photography Exhibit, two of my images were accepted by the juror, Joseph Miller.  The exhibit opens Sat May 5 and runs through Mon May 28, 2018 at Joseph Miller Center for the Photographic Arts in Gainesville, VA.  I’m not sure if they will show the entire exhibit online at any point but will let you know if they do.

Marina Reflections 3

Ribbons of Color 3

Now I need to prepare prints and get them shipped.  Thanks for all your input and support!

 

Out there, again.

A while ago, I shared a post about submitting my work to exhibits otherwise known as call for entry.  In that post I explained why I spend the time, money, and emotional energy doing this: Entering images provides me with another outlet for my work, a way to have BNF’s (big names in the field) see my work, and to receive some feedback on it, even if that feedback is simply being accepted or not.   Having work accepted for an exhibit helps me to build a resume that shows my work has been exhibited at the national level.  And it’s just fun!

I’ve been up to it again recently.  The themes for three calls for entry seemed to fit with some of my work.

Photo Place Gallery in Middlebury, VT had a call for the theme, Capturing the Light. None of the images I submitted were selected for the exhibit, but you can see the final selections here.

The Northern Virginia Alliance of Camera Clubs (NVACC) is currently putting together their 8th Annual Joseph Miller Abstract Exhibit.  This is a new venue for me but it was appealing because it is in my new home state and because much of my work falls into the category of abstract, so I thought this call for entry would be worth a submission.  Do you think any of these six images will be accepted?  Results are due this weekend.

The SE Center for Photography in Greenville, SC. is also a new venue for me apply to a call for entry.  They currently have a call for the theme Seasons.  “Spring is fast approaching and what better time to celebrate the use of color in photography. We usually think of color and seasons to mean landscapes, but this time let’s not limit it to just the landscape, or Spring. All subject matter relating to seasons, digital, analog or alternative methods.”   What do you think the chances are for these images?  Results will be announced next week.

I recently found this wonderful article by Douglas Beasley, a well respected photographer, on what it’s like for a juror.  It helps put the whole process in perspective for those entering their work.

I’ll let you know next week how my images did in the Abstract and the Seasons exhibits.

 

 

 

Friday Finds: Ruth A B Clegg

A couple of years ago, I attended a day long seminar in the Boston area.  Ruth Clegg was one of the three speakers.   I was inspired by her work and her approach to photography.  She incorporated printmaking into her world, not just the darkroom kind of photographic prints but the process of creating prints by making impressions on paper.   At the time, I’d never seen anyone do that with photography, only with stencils.  I loved the quality of those carefully crafted prints.

What also inspired me about Ruth’s work was her sense of experimentation.   A great deal of her time is spent on the water in Rhode Island as well as the Adirondacks.  She shared with us a project that she had been working on to photograph underneath the water while in her kayak.   I was excited to be able to see the result of the project recently at the View Center for the Arts in Old Forge, NY.    I loved the work so much, I’ve been to see it twice.

What inspired me about Ruth’s exhibit is the uncommon view she provided of a world we don’t normally see.  The quality of light in the images, as well as her choices for printing, were also fascinating to me.

If you are anywhere near Old Forge, NY, even within a 100 miles or so, treat yourself and see her exhibit before it closes October 16.  If you can’t make it in person, enjoy a selection of the images here.

View Art Center-Under & Over, exploration of Adirondack pond life. Ruth AB Clegg

View Art Center-Under & Over, exploration of Adirondack pond life. Ruth AB Clegg

This says it all.

“To photograph is to hold one’s breath, when all faculties converge to capture fleeting reality. It’s at that precise moment that mastering an image becomes a great physical and intellectual joy.”                                                                                                                 Henri Cartier-Bresson

I’m busy taking a wonderful online class with Laura ValentiThis quote from famous French photographer, Cartier-Bresson, was used in one of the lessons.  Despite my predilection for quote collecting, I had never read this one before.  When I first read it, I was stunned as it sums up precisely what photography is for me.

That “great physical and intellectual joy” is so so true for me when I am creating with my camera.  This image, from an afternoon of creating with water and color and movement, is a result of that joy.

“Fleeting reality” is also what I work to capture, those moments that are here for a split second and then gone.  But then, isn’t that all of life?

I hope you find some joy in those fleeting moments this week.

 

Fall Water Abstract-03_©Gail Haile

Fall Water Abstract-03_©Gail Haile Prints available.

Always seeing something

The end of summer always seems a time to stop and pause before moving on with the year.  In that spirit, I’m going to do “Blog Lite” for the next few weeks.  I’ll simple share a few of my images and some quotes that inspire me.

“Always seeing something, never seeing nothing, being photographer”

Walter De Mulder

marina-reflections-2_gailshaile

Abstract of colorful water reflections at the marina. Prints available. Click on image.

 

Patterns of Yellowstone – More Water

Did you see the water patterns last week?  I told you I couldn’t choose, so here are some more for you to enjoy.

The water flowing out of the hot springs often causes elaborate and unique patterns in the rock and sand as in the first four images.  Some of the colors result from the minerals and thermophiles in the water and others are reflections from the sky.

Strong sunlight striking a mountain stream created the abstract patterns in the final four images. When you first look at the stream, it’s easy to overlook how many colors are actually there.

Do you have a favorite from this group?  Which one? and why?

Wildlife abounds in all forms in Yellowstone.  I’ll share some of those images next time.

Patterns of Yellowstone – Water

My favorite patterns in Yellowstone were those made by water.  In the last couple of posts, I’ve shared images of Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, both panoramic images of the grand scenes as well as images of patterns created by the trees of those parks.

I am a water person.  Everything about water fascinates me and being near water connects with something deep in my soul.  Water is found in all forms in the parks from the snow and glaciers that cover the high peaks, to the rushing streams and waterfalls, to the steam rising from the hot springs.

Those hot springs provided some of the most interesting colors and patterns.  Some of the colors were present due to the minerals in the water, others were evidence of thermophiles that thrive in hot environments.   Whatever the source, I was fascinated with the gorgeous colors and patterns I saw.

I had a hard time choosing just a few water patterns, so next time I’ll share a few more.

Can you choose a favorite?